On Coconut Oil and PD

Love
Love

Last year we brought you the story of a 74-year-old man suffering from Parkinson’s disease and his remarkable testimonial of how coconut oil changed his life (see: Coconut Oil Improves Life of 74-Year-Old Man with Parkinson’s.)

Now, he is taking an online “straw poll” of other Parkinson’s sufferers and their experiences in using coconut oil. Several have replied and here are some of the comments:

“I believe Coconut Oil decreased the size of my prostrate gland as indicated by much improved urine flow.”

“Major decrease in tremor when taking Coconut Oil while in ketosis.”

“COCONUT OIL has changed my life dramatically. I now:

Walk faster
Speak louder
Stand straighter
Cut my own meat
Button my own buttons
Brush my teeth without an electric toothbrush
Handwriting is improved
Can do more chores
Get out of chairs and cars much easier
I’m calmer and less nervous”
“Lessened tremors, no more problems with swallowing or saliva.”

“Weight stable, blood lipids good.”

Have you tried coconut oil? Have you noticed any differences?

 

Medford’s Sole Support for PD

The Sole Support Walk-a-thon was a huge success!!!

Our town raised more per person than the rest of the state and considering Medford is one of the more depressed areas in Oregon, that’s a big deal!

We (myself, Josie, Ken, and the invincible Finn {who is checking out the balloons in the photo below}) did the 1k walk quite successfully. No tripping, no falling…

Our team (Team Grammy, as Finn aptly named us) raised 3 times our  personal goal, thanks to many of you.

Finn’s mommy made an adorable custom shirt for him, which is modeled in the last two photos.

We were able to meet some other local PWP’s and see Holly Chaimov, PRO’s director, hear the Uke-ladies, meet some healthcare vendors and more.

Thanks to all who supported my team and I, once again.

You are a huge encouragement!!!

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Grammy’s Team

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The Invincible Finn and Mommy

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The Uke-Ladies

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Holly, myself, and Melissa Moran

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Finn, Mommy, myself

(picture courtesy of Holly Chaimov)

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I Am My Own Worst Advocate

The other day I stood at my window and watched a man walk down the street. He looked suspitious and he was walking funny. Suspitious because he was checking out every house as he passed by each one and was a bit unkept. Walking funny because he seemed a bit off balance, as if he may have stopped by the local tavern before taking his walk.

I voiced my thoughts verbally to husband who was in the room with me. The moment my judgmental words escaped through my lips, I knew I had made a mistake.

Ten minutes later the same man came walking back and checked out the neighbors front yards and carports, still seeming a bit off balance in his gait. And then he turned up one of the driveways a few houses down and I realized who it was.

Not a stranger, casing houses while the occupannts were away from home, but someone who I didn’t recognize as he’s gone 80% of the time, traveling for his work. And he has a funny walk that makes him look a little off balance, but because I don’t know him well and don’t see him often, I didn’t know it was him and erroneously passed judgement.

I am my own worst advocate.

How many times have I read about the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease and how they are misinterpreted by mis- or uninformed individuals who judge what they know very little of? How many times have I fallen victim to such ignorance?

And yet, there I stood at my window, heaping ignorance upon ignorance as I wondered if the man I was observing was snockered. Just as soon as I had voiced it, as I said earlier, I knew I had done the same thing all those people do when they ask, “What’s wrong with you? You never look happy anymore.” (In reference to the stone face syndrome.) Or, “Do I really make you that nervous?” (In reference to shaking/trembling while holding a conversation with a friend.)

They  (‘those’ people) don’t know any better.

I do.

If I am going to be  an effective advocate for Parkinson’s disease, I need to not be doing what would be expected from someone who is uneducated in PD – making assumptions as to why someone is behaving, acting, moving, or speaking a certain way. There are so many invisible diseases and the truth is, you never know who is fighting what.

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