Dystonia and Bear Hugs

imageDystonia.

A neurological movement disorder that deals with sustained muscle contractions, causing twisting and repetitive movements or abnormal postures and can be a part of having Parkinson’s disease.

Symptoms of dystonia can include disturbed sleep patterns, tiredness, depression, poor concentration, change in vision, and more.  Normal activities can be more difficult to carry out.  Dystonia mimics other diseases as well, making it extremely important to not self-diagnose.  Neurologists and Movement Disorder Specialists are physicians specializing in various areas such as dystonia and Parkinson’s Disease, with the ability to clearly differentiate (although sometimes difficult in doing so, depending on how the disease manifests its symptoms) the similarities of diseases with commonalities such as these.

As well as the experiencing the symptoms listed above, dystonia tends to lend itself to continuous pain, cramping and muscle spasms. Because of the areas that can be affected, penmanship may become altered, dropping items becomes common, turning pages becomes a struggle.  The list can go on.

Focal dystonias are the most common types of dystonia are known as focal dystonias.  Another – Cervical dystonia – affects the neck muscles, whereas blepharospasm dystonia is known to affect the muscles around the eyes.  When the jaw and tongue muscles are affected, it is known as oromandibular dystonia.  The voice can be affected, causing a ‘crackling’ sound and is known as spasmodic dysphonia. When a patient suffers from both blepharospasmodic contractions and oromandibular dystonia, it is referred to as cranial dystonia, also known as Meige’s syndrome.

imageWhile some cases can worsen over time, some can almost be mild in their degree of symptoms and their affects on the body. Many drug treatments have been successful in managing symptoms, but recent treatments using botox have proven extremely successful for 3-6 months when injected into the affected areas.  Many PD treatments, including deep brain stimulation, are used for treating dystonia and are quite promising in helping the patient to cope with the disease.

What may seem like an odd treatment may actually be one of the best received and most helpful… a big hug. It has been proven that when encased in a tight ‘bear hug’ the tension and tightening of the contracted muscles are often released when squeezed tightly.

There aren’t many diseases (if any, that I am aware of!) that respond to such a simple, welcomed treatment. So – the next time you’re struggling with stiffness, spasms, and pain associated with having Parkinson’s disease and/or dystonia, ask a loved one to give you a tight bear hug and hold you for a few minutes.  You’ll  not only feel better physically but in every other way as well and so will they.  There is healing in a hug – for everyone involved.

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