YOU COULD EARN $300 FOR HAVING PD AND A RECHARGEABLE DBS IMPLANT!

Qessential, a medical market research company that is devoted to the medical device and pharmaceutical industry, has a client that is currently seeking to conduct in-person interviews with individuals who have Parkinson’s disease and who have received a rechargeable DBS implant for the management of their symptoms.

The goal of the study is to understand what the individual dealing iwth PD goes through, how he or she makes the decision to get a DBS unit, how both the device and his/her condition impacts day-to-day life, and what could be changed about the device or the process of receiving the device that might make things better for the individual, as well as for others dealing with the same situation.

The study involves a two hour in-home interview with an honorarium of $300 upon successful completion. Interested individuals may contact Deborah Booker of Qessential directly at 1-800-932-4249 or email her at Deborah@qmmr.net.

Please note:
*Patients should have rechargeable units.
*Patients should have received implants preferably (not mandatory) within the last year.

*Patients should preferably (not mandatory) be under the age of 70.

The company is happy to speak with individuals who fall outside the preferred parameters, as well, and to add their contact information to their database so that patients can be contacted about future studies related to PD.

 

More Info on New PD Drug

AbbVie Announces U.S. FDA Approval of DUOPA™ (carbidopa and levodopa) Enteral Suspension for the Treatment of Motor Fluctuations in Patients with Advanced Parkinson’s Disease

· DUOPA is the first and only treatment providing 16 continuous hours of carbidopa and levodopa for motor fluctuations in advanced Parkinson’s disease

· In a clinical trial, patients treated with DUOPA experienced significantly greater improvement in “off” time than patients treated with oral carbidopa-levodopa immediate release tablets

NORTH CHICAGO, Ill. January 12, 2015 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved AbbVie’s (NYSE: ABBV) DUOPA™ (carbidopa and levodopa) enteral suspension for the treatment of motor fluctuations for people with advanced Parkinson’s disease. DUOPA is administered using a small, portable infusion pump that delivers carbidopa and levodopa directly into the small intestine for 16 continuous hours via a procedurally-placed tube.

DUOPA was approved by the FDA as an orphan drug, a designation granted to products intended for the treatment of rare diseases or conditions affecting fewer than 200,000 patients in the U.S.

“There is unmet need for treatment options for patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease. As the disease advances, it can be difficult to control motor features,” said C. Warren Olanow, M.D., Professor, Department of Neurology and Department of Neuroscience, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and lead investigator of the DUOPA pivotal trial. “In clinical trials, DUOPA was shown to significantly reduce the amount of off time advanced Parkinson’s disease patients experienced.”

In the advanced stages of Parkinson’s disease, patients may begin to experience “off” time, or periods of poor mobility, slowness and stiffness. Additionally, in Parkinson’s disease patients, the spontaneous emptying of the stomach becomes delayed and unpredictable, which can affect the timing of when orally administered medicines leave the stomach and are absorbed in the small intestine. DUOPA provides patients with the same active ingredients as orally-administered carbidopa and levodopa immediate release, but is delivered in a suspension that goes directly into the small intestine via a tube placed by a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy procedure with jejunal extension (PEG-J). This type of administration is intended to bypass the stomach.

“The FDA approval of DUOPA is another significant milestone for AbbVie’s pipeline,” said Michael Severino, M.D., Executive Vice President, Research and Development and Chief Scientific Officer, AbbVie. “This advancement is important for patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease and their care teams, as it provides a new therapeutic option to help manage motor symptoms.”

“Due to the progressive nature of Parkinson’s disease, it can be difficult to treat over time, especially in the advanced stages,” said Joyce Oberdorf, President and CEO, National Parkinson Foundation. “Our organization is encouraged by the introduction of a new therapy that may provide another treatment option for affected patients and families.”