On Coconut Oil and PD

Love
Love

Last year we brought you the story of a 74-year-old man suffering from Parkinson’s disease and his remarkable testimonial of how coconut oil changed his life (see: Coconut Oil Improves Life of 74-Year-Old Man with Parkinson’s.)

Now, he is taking an online “straw poll” of other Parkinson’s sufferers and their experiences in using coconut oil. Several have replied and here are some of the comments:

“I believe Coconut Oil decreased the size of my prostrate gland as indicated by much improved urine flow.”

“Major decrease in tremor when taking Coconut Oil while in ketosis.”

“COCONUT OIL has changed my life dramatically. I now:

Walk faster
Speak louder
Stand straighter
Cut my own meat
Button my own buttons
Brush my teeth without an electric toothbrush
Handwriting is improved
Can do more chores
Get out of chairs and cars much easier
I’m calmer and less nervous”
“Lessened tremors, no more problems with swallowing or saliva.”

“Weight stable, blood lipids good.”

Have you tried coconut oil? Have you noticed any differences?

 

Next In Line

Ballerina
Ballerina

When you’ve been blessed with the companionship of the Little Monster we so familiarly and ‘un-affectionately’ call Parkinson’s Disease, you may get tense and tight at the mere mention of… PD.

For some with Parkinson’s, you haven’t experienced much stiffness. Maybe no pain.  Maybe lots.  Whether you have or not, there is something you can do for yourself that will keep you a little looser, a little more mobile, a little happier.  It’s a little treat you can give to yourself.

A massage.  Massage therapy has been proven to improve the patient’s day to day activities, sleeping habits, walking, stress, and more.  Rigidity, stiffness, fatigue and more have also been proven to get relief from this little treat.  If these symptoms aren’t addressed, depression, a poor self-esteem, and or isolation can set in or get worse.

In a five week study where patients with PD were given muscle relaxants versus massage therapy two times a week, both groups showed improvement but the trophy went to those receiving massages.  They showed a greater response in their ability to handle day to day activities and in their stress levels (going down).

We’ve always known a back rub feels nice.  A massage will not only help the rigidity, stiffness, stress, etc., it will leave you feeling great.  Most neurologists or Movement Disorder Specialists will advise you to add this as part of your treatment.  So, grab your car keys and tootle on down to the local massage therapist (make sure you choose someone reputable – consult your doctor), and make yourself an appointment.  Maybe you’ll have timed it well and be the next in line.

Check your healthcare insurance program.  Some will cover this type of treatment to some degree, as it is considered treatment for Parkinson’s Disease.

Dystonia and Bear Hugs

imageDystonia.

A neurological movement disorder that deals with sustained muscle contractions, causing twisting and repetitive movements or abnormal postures and can be a part of having Parkinson’s disease.

Symptoms of dystonia can include disturbed sleep patterns, tiredness, depression, poor concentration, change in vision, and more.  Normal activities can be more difficult to carry out.  Dystonia mimics other diseases as well, making it extremely important to not self-diagnose.  Neurologists and Movement Disorder Specialists are physicians specializing in various areas such as dystonia and Parkinson’s Disease, with the ability to clearly differentiate (although sometimes difficult in doing so, depending on how the disease manifests its symptoms) the similarities of diseases with commonalities such as these.

As well as the experiencing the symptoms listed above, dystonia tends to lend itself to continuous pain, cramping and muscle spasms. Because of the areas that can be affected, penmanship may become altered, dropping items becomes common, turning pages becomes a struggle.  The list can go on.

Focal dystonias are the most common types of dystonia are known as focal dystonias.  Another – Cervical dystonia – affects the neck muscles, whereas blepharospasm dystonia is known to affect the muscles around the eyes.  When the jaw and tongue muscles are affected, it is known as oromandibular dystonia.  The voice can be affected, causing a ‘crackling’ sound and is known as spasmodic dysphonia. When a patient suffers from both blepharospasmodic contractions and oromandibular dystonia, it is referred to as cranial dystonia, also known as Meige’s syndrome.

imageWhile some cases can worsen over time, some can almost be mild in their degree of symptoms and their affects on the body. Many drug treatments have been successful in managing symptoms, but recent treatments using botox have proven extremely successful for 3-6 months when injected into the affected areas.  Many PD treatments, including deep brain stimulation, are used for treating dystonia and are quite promising in helping the patient to cope with the disease.

What may seem like an odd treatment may actually be one of the best received and most helpful… a big hug. It has been proven that when encased in a tight ‘bear hug’ the tension and tightening of the contracted muscles are often released when squeezed tightly.

There aren’t many diseases (if any, that I am aware of!) that respond to such a simple, welcomed treatment. So – the next time you’re struggling with stiffness, spasms, and pain associated with having Parkinson’s disease and/or dystonia, ask a loved one to give you a tight bear hug and hold you for a few minutes.  You’ll  not only feel better physically but in every other way as well and so will they.  There is healing in a hug – for everyone involved.

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