On Coconut Oil and PD

Love
Love

Last year we brought you the story of a 74-year-old man suffering from Parkinson’s disease and his remarkable testimonial of how coconut oil changed his life (see: Coconut Oil Improves Life of 74-Year-Old Man with Parkinson’s.)

Now, he is taking an online “straw poll” of other Parkinson’s sufferers and their experiences in using coconut oil. Several have replied and here are some of the comments:

“I believe Coconut Oil decreased the size of my prostrate gland as indicated by much improved urine flow.”

“Major decrease in tremor when taking Coconut Oil while in ketosis.”

“COCONUT OIL has changed my life dramatically. I now:

Walk faster
Speak louder
Stand straighter
Cut my own meat
Button my own buttons
Brush my teeth without an electric toothbrush
Handwriting is improved
Can do more chores
Get out of chairs and cars much easier
I’m calmer and less nervous”
“Lessened tremors, no more problems with swallowing or saliva.”

“Weight stable, blood lipids good.”

Have you tried coconut oil? Have you noticed any differences?

 

Next In Line

Ballerina
Ballerina

When you’ve been blessed with the companionship of the Little Monster we so familiarly and ‘un-affectionately’ call Parkinson’s Disease, you may get tense and tight at the mere mention of… PD.

For some with Parkinson’s, you haven’t experienced much stiffness. Maybe no pain.  Maybe lots.  Whether you have or not, there is something you can do for yourself that will keep you a little looser, a little more mobile, a little happier.  It’s a little treat you can give to yourself.

A massage.  Massage therapy has been proven to improve the patient’s day to day activities, sleeping habits, walking, stress, and more.  Rigidity, stiffness, fatigue and more have also been proven to get relief from this little treat.  If these symptoms aren’t addressed, depression, a poor self-esteem, and or isolation can set in or get worse.

In a five week study where patients with PD were given muscle relaxants versus massage therapy two times a week, both groups showed improvement but the trophy went to those receiving massages.  They showed a greater response in their ability to handle day to day activities and in their stress levels (going down).

We’ve always known a back rub feels nice.  A massage will not only help the rigidity, stiffness, stress, etc., it will leave you feeling great.  Most neurologists or Movement Disorder Specialists will advise you to add this as part of your treatment.  So, grab your car keys and tootle on down to the local massage therapist (make sure you choose someone reputable – consult your doctor), and make yourself an appointment.  Maybe you’ll have timed it well and be the next in line.

Check your healthcare insurance program.  Some will cover this type of treatment to some degree, as it is considered treatment for Parkinson’s Disease.

On Haldol (Haloperidol)… Again.

In Black and White
In Black and White

For some time, it has been known that Haldol (Haloperidol) is one drug that should be avoided by people who have Parkinson’s disease.  It amazes me that conferences I have attended, webinars I have seen, things I have read by specialized doctors in the PD community all reiterate the claim: stay away from this and other like drugs.

However, when you talk to many PD patients, they have no idea that there is any concern over certain drugs being administered to PD patients.  Why? Because in most cases, they administered while you are in the hospital for some other reason other than PD related and the medical staff is unaware of the dangers, as well.

Most nurses AND doctors are not educated in the field of Parkinson’s disease and so administering drugs to calm a patient is seemingly protocol – NOT.

Over Thanksgiving, my mother n-law was telling about her time in the hospital a few years back and a doctor on duty ordered an MRI for her. She fought with the orderly over going to have it done as she lay in her hospital bed. She told the orderly, after insisting she wasn’t stepping foot in that room, that she had a pace maker.  The doctor later came to her and apologized for that ‘minor’ overlook.  What if she hadn’t been coherent? What if…

The point: you have to be proactive with your care and treatment. You have to know more about you than those caring for you or a life-threatening mistake could occur (see my previously published article of a PD patient and their experience with Haldol as told by his son in-law).

So, if you have PD,  here are the drugs you need to make  a note of to AVOID: Haloperidol (marketed as Haldol, Haldol Decanoate, and Haldol Lactate). This is an antii-psychotic drug, often prescribed to people with schizophrenia. Other like drugs include risperidone (Risperdal), aripiprazole (Abilify) and olanzapine (Zyprexa). These drugs will play havoc on your brain or much worse. One conference speaker (doctor – movement disorder specialist) went so far as to say they will KILL a person with PD.

There are, however, two drugs (antipsychotic) that can be used  without  a problem to the PD patient: quetiapine (Seroquel) and clozapine (Clozapine).

Well, I have done my Haldol rant for the year, but I’ll be back just in case you forget.

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