An Acrostic: Just What Is Parkinson’s Disease?

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Sprinkled Pink Photo by Sherri Woodbridge, 2016

Painful.

Always present. Always. Even if ‘evidence’ is not outwardly apparent.

Relentless. Mentally, physically, and emotionally.

Kin-friendly. While research shows the numbers to be close to nil for PD to be hereditary, researchers now think that about 7 or 8 percent of patients with PD have a direct genetic link.

Individualistic. No two cases are exactly alike.

Non-discrimitory. Anyone, any age, any race, any shape or size, any language, any gender, anywhere, any hair color, any time, day or night. You get the picture, right?

Shuffle-walking-causer

Oblivious to how I may want my day to go.

Not very nice. No. Not at all.

Shaker-maker

 

Drool and depression inducer

Icky, icky, icky

Stiffness and slowness creator

Enhancer of humility in so very many, many ways

Apathy-maker

Subject to dystonia and dyskinesia and great dislike by its recipient

Exactly that aforementioned above and much more!

Team Parkinson’s – The Captains, The Players, The Benchsitters, and The Fans

Whether you have had Parkinson’s disease for awhile, have been newly diagnosed, have been diagnosed with Young Onset Parkinson’s disease, etc., sooner or later you’re going to want to talk to someone about it who really understands – someone who’s been there already on the journey with this Little Monster.
 
A support group can be your lifeline because it is like a team. If you think about it, the best teams are those that work together and are not made up of players who seek to go solo and feel they can do it all on their own. Like the old adage, “There’s no “I” in TEAM.”
Every team has a coach. Someone who knows the game well. Someone who has played the game before. Maybe even already coached other teams in the past. Someone who can show you the best moves. Show you areas you can improve.
Every team has a captain – a peer who leads, can keep things going, encourage the team to do their best and play to win even though they themselves are playing the same game, win or lose. They have a winning attitude. They play to win.
And in order for the team to perform well, each player needs to be ‘in the game’. Just because you’re part of the team in number, doesn’t necessarily mean you’re ‘part of the team’. Bench sitters don’t contribute a whole lot in terms of playing the game, but they can. Instead of sitting in a puddle of pity or with an attitude of anger, they can be cheering on the others who are able to play hard this time around. They can have a cup of cold water ready for the next player who finds himself needing to sit on the bench a while. They can support and encourage their teams mates making their role invaluable.
 
Of course teams are made up of the players themselves. Some seem to play in every meet, game, match and the like. They appear “better” but  they are not more valuable for we all contribute in some way, in some capacity for the win – the cure.
Players are ‘equal’. The quarterback can appear to be the star but there’s no way he’s going to make it to the end zone without the support and assistance of the rest of his team. A pitcher doesn’t play alone in the game of baseball. Even sports that appear to be played ‘solo’ – tennis, marathons, boxing, etc – are all part of a team of some sort.
Players are constantly working together, fighting together for that win. Maybe one player will be able to run the length of the court today and even make. That winning basket, but tomorrow they may be benched due to an ailment or injury.
If you’re a player on Team PD, still able to move freely without many constraints, don’t forget about the bench sitters who long to be in the game, but find themselves ‘benched’ for now. They may have a lousy attitude, or have a positive one. Either way, they are still part of this team  and in great need of some encouraging words. 
 
And remember, for every team, there are fans. They come out, sit through the tough plays and cheer on the sidelines. They are there in the rain, the cold and the biting wind. No matter the weather, they still show up for ‘their’ team. On Team PD, fans can be friends, family, caregivers.

Whatever part of the PD team you’re in, you’re not playing in this lifelong game alone. Get into a support group, find a ‘coach’, a ‘captain’, someone who’s been there and can encourage you in your game. Remember… You are not alone.

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